Choosing A Healthy Diet Plan

February 27, 2011

Choosing a healthy diet plan may require the services of a certified nutritionist, with medical input by your physician. This could entail two trips to the doctor’s office, and a number of sit-downs with the nutritionist, before you even get started.

This is the preferred way to start a healthy diet plan, especially if you are under a doctor’s care for diabetes, hypertension, or heart disease. Planning is essential to establish the don’ts, and to determine the extent of the do’s. You don’t want to regret not taking these initial steps later on.

After you get rolling with your diet plan, there would still be a need for occasional consultations with both professionals, to monitor your progress. They may make adjustment to your diet plan as you proceed toward your goal.

No healthy diet plan is complete without regular exercise. A personal trainer would be ideal, if you can afford one. But most people would rather become a member of a health spa or exercise gym, where personal trainer services are included in the membership fees. The services may not be too personal, but will suffice.

The nutritionist, doctor, and trainer could become a costly venture. In fact, it could cost you two arms and a leg to actually start a healthy diet plan. But thank heavens there is a way to keep your arms and leg, and pay almost nothing to achieve the same benefits.

Dietary Guidelines

The US Department of Agriculture and the Department of Health and Human Services announced the release of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The Dietary Guidelines is published jointly every 5 years by the Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

The Dietary Guidelines provides advice for all Americans two years and older about how to make healthy dietary choices. It is designed to reduce the risk of chronic diseases, overweight and obesity through improved nutrition and physical exercise.

This 7th edition of Dietary Guidelines for Americans places stronger emphasis on reducing calorie consumption and increasing physical activity and/or exercise, because more than one-third of all children and more than two-thirds of adults in the United States are overweight or obese. This edition, like previous ones, also serves as the basis for Federal food and nutrition education programs.

Structure of Food Guides

Most countries have developed some sort of food nutrition guide, for its people, establishing healthy dietary and nutrition plans to keep the nation healthy. The guide usually consists of four to six food groups, detailing the daily servings from each group, and other recommendations for healthy eating.

Some food nutrition guides take the shape of a dish, a platter, or a pyramid, and are referred to as such. The USDA food nutrition guide takes the shape of a pyramid, and is called MyPyramid.

MyPyramid

STEPS FOR A HEALTHIER YOU

MyPyramid illustrates color triangles for each food category. Foods from the largest triangles should be eaten most often, while those from the smallest triangle eaten in small amounts.

MyPyramid Plan gives dietary recommendations for healthy eating, by helping you choose from a assortment of foods, recommending the servings size and the number servings per day.

MyPyramid Basic Messages gives you important tips and recommendations for healthy eating, and daily exercise.

Inside MyPyramid provides detail recommendations for healthy eating, to help improve your diet plan, including data about each food group, number of calories, and physical workout.

MyPyramid Tracker offers an activity chart for entering all foods eaten each day, and all daily physical activities performed.

This allows you to adopt good recommendations for healthy eating, and monitor your progress.

The Healthy Diet Program

MyPyramid Plan is equipped with a tool that creates a unique diet program for the individual diet planner. It utilizes age, sex, weight, height, and the level of your physical daily activity to calculate your daily dietary recommendations. It provides the amount of each food group to include in your daily dietary intake, and the number of calories for your diet plan.

A special worksheet is provided for documentation of your daily food intake and physical activity. Very little typing is required. You make selections from pop up menus about your daily activities. Upon request, your daily activities are compared against dietary guidelines, and some recommendations are made to improve your diet plan. The worksheet is printable. Use it as a reference guide, to construct a healthy diet plan.

MyPyramids Plan also features MyPyramid Tracker, an online dietary and physical assessment tool that provides information about healthy diet plans and physical activity. At the click of a button, you are told whether you are eating adequately from all food groups. It also provides information about the food groups, which enables you to make excellent choices designing a healthy diet plan.

As you can see, MyPyramid Plan provides the services of a nutritionist, to help you create a healthy diet plan, that doesn’t cost you your arms and leg. But for those people who suffer certain diseases, physical activities are not recommended before a consultation with your physician.

To get started click on over to MyPyramid Plan, fill in the information, follow the instructions, and you will create a customized healthy diet plan to fit your individual needs.

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New Years Health Resolution

December 31, 2007

New Year celebrants make all kinds of resolutions, which are all good. But I believe the most important resolution one can make, is to improve their personal health, and help friends and relatives to do likewise. Good health is more important than things. It is because of your good health you acquire things, actually.

Michael Pollan’s guide through the increasingly treacherous landscape of food choices has established six rules for eating wisely:

1. Don’t eat anything your great-great-great grandmother wouldn’t recognized as food

2. Avoid foods containing high-fructose.

3. Spend more, eat less.

4. Pay no heed to nutritional science or the health claims on packages.

5. Shop at the farmers’ market.

6. How you eat is as important as what you eat.

Most people are obsessed with the idea of eating healthy, but still substitute butter for margarine. So this new year, make your resolution follow grandma’s rules: eat moderate portions, don’t go for seconds or snack between meals, and never eat alone.

Click on the link below to read Michael Pollan’s New York Times article. You can also checkout his latest book “The Omnivore’s Dilemma”.

[READ]


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